National Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month is observed during September and sponsored by The Johnny O Foundation. National Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) raise awareness about traumatic brain injury (TBI). Improved prevention, recognition, and response can help address this important public health problem. Prevent traumatic brain injury by understanding the risks, signs, and symptoms.

National Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month educates us that the most common form of head injury is called mild traumatic brain injury, or “concussion.” Concussions don’t happen just from sports, and they don’t just happen to young adults. Concussions frequently happen to the aging population from falls and are overlooked. They are common after car accidents or any other trauma to the skull. It is also important to realize injury doesn’t necessarily correlate with how hard the blow to the head was and in 90% of cases, does not result in a loss of consciousness.

Facts and Stats on Traumatic Brain Injury:

99% of NFL players in a brain donation program were diagnosed with brain damage after death.

26,212 non-fatal bicycling related brain injuries occur annually.

2.8 million Traumatic brain injuries occurred in 2013, the most recent data from the CDC.

19.5% of high school athletes have had a concussion.

5.5% of high school athletes have had more than one concussion.

$400,000 is the lifetime cost of a severe brain injury.

153 deaths occur each day from injuries that include a brain injury.

53,000 deaths from brain injury occur each year.

47% of ER visits were for brain injuries from 2007 to 2013.

3.2 to 5.3 million Americans are living with a TBI-related disability.

70% of all sports and recreation-related brain injuries were reported in people ages 19 and younger.

National Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month Sponsor:
The Johnny O Foundation
To learn more, visit http://www.thejohnnyo.org

The awareness color for Traumatic Brain Injury is Green.

 

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